CIA says mistakenly 'shredded' Senate torture report then did not

CIA says mistakenly 'shredded' Senate torture report then did notBy Patricia Zengerle WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Central Intelligence Agency thought for months that it had mistakenly shredded a massive U.S. Senate report on its use of waterboarding and other "enhanced interrogation techniques" before suddenly discovering that its copy had not been lost after all, an agency official said on Tuesday. "It's embarrassing and I have apologized," Christopher Sharpley, the acting CIA Inspector General, told the Senate Intelligence Committee during his confirmation hearing as President Donald Trump's nominee for the position. Championed by Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein when she chaired the Senate panel, the "torture report," as it is known, is the result of a six-year investigation into so-called enhanced interrogation techniques used by the CIA after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, during the administration of Republican President George W. Bush.



NFL policy on anthem kneeling unchanged, despite Trump rebuke

NFL policy on anthem kneeling unchanged, despite Trump rebukeBy Jonathan Allen NEW YORK (Reuters) - National Football League officials weighed the fervor of players protesting racism against U.S. President Donald Trump's anger at their autumn meeting on Tuesday with supporters of the players kneeling outside in solidarity. The NFL did not seek commitments from its players to stop kneeling during pregame renditions of the U.S. national anthem but rather focused on helping them in their political activism. About issues in our communities to make our communities better," NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell told reporters.



Crews push to contain California fires, search for bodies

Crews push to contain California fires, search for bodiesBy Jim Christie SANTA ROSA, Calif. (Reuters) - Crews fought their way across rugged, steep terrain on Tuesday in a push to gain full control of the deadliest wildfires in California history, as search-and-rescue teams picked through an ashy moonscape of destroyed homes looking for victims. "There are still some concerns that if the west winds come up or we get some erratic winds they could push our lines, but as of right now we're looking pretty good," Steve Crawford, a fire operations chief, told reporters at a briefing in Sonoma County in the heart of California's celebrated wine country. Already 41 people have been confirmed killed in the fires, which erupted last week and were driven by dry, hot winds into Northern California communities, giving residents little or no chance to escape.



Las Vegas gunman's estate could offer rare redress for victims

Las Vegas gunman's estate could offer rare redress for victimsBy Tina Bellon NEW YORK (Reuters) - Victims of mass shootings in the United States often win little or no damages from perpetrators but the Las Vegas massacre may be different because the shooter is thought to have been a wealthy man, lawyers said. While there are often few assets to collect from the young men who typically carry out these killings, Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock, 64, is thought to have had multi-million-dollar investments in buildings across Texas and California. "It definitely depends on the assets in the estate whether you pursue that claim," said Theida Salazar, a Los Angeles attorney who represented one of the victim's families in the 2015 shooting in San Bernadino, California.



Chicago Aviation Dept fires two officers involved in dragging man off flight

Chicago Aviation Dept fires two officers involved in dragging man off flightThe Chicago Department of Aviation has fired two security officers for their roles in the forcible removal of a passenger on a United Airlines flight in April, an incident that provoked international outrage. The firings were included in a report on the incident released on Tuesday by the Chicago Office of the Inspector General. David Dao, a 69-year-old Vietnamese-American physician, was hospitalized after aviation officers dragged him from a United Airlines plane to make space for four crew members on the flight from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport to Louisville, Kentucky.





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